Crozier Brown – June 17, 2021

On Thursday, June 17, 2021, J. Crozier Brown, loving husband, father and grandfather, was called home by the Lord at the age of 78.

Crozier was born on July 14, 1942 in Waco, TX to Benjamin F. Brown III and Mary Hunt Brown. He grew up and graduated high school in Waco, TX before moving to Austin, TX to further his education. While attending the University of Texas at Austin, he earned a Bachelor of Science degree and a Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the College of Engineering now known as the Cockrell School of Engineering. Upon completing his graduate degree, Crozier served as a leader and early adopter in the use of information technology to find civil and petroleum engineering solutions.

When Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and satellite imagery were new technologies, he was an early adapter who learned how to apply these tools to the engineering discipline, demonstrating their value and guiding users. He also co-authored the computer software used to design the drainage system for the 18,000-acre Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. For his contributions in the field of engineering, Crozier was inducted into the University of Texas Civil, Architectural and Environmental Academy of Distinguished Alumni in September 2016.

After his successful career as an engineer, Crozier, a man of strong faith and a friend to anyone who met him continued serving the community as an active participant in many civic and philanthropic endeavors. He served on the board of the Twelfth Step Ministry dedicated to the support of individuals in North Texas, and he also served as a member of the Shelton School Board in Dallas, TX, always working to help individuals empower themselves and reach their full personal and academic potential.

The patriarch of the family, Crozier was a great family man and friend to all who knew him. Along with his sweet temperament and big heart, Crozier enjoyed the company of others and loved spending time partaking in hobbies such as hunting, golfing, going out for nice dinners and watching and rooting for his beloved UT Longhorns.

Crozier is survived by his loving wife of 49 years, Rita Taylor Brown of Dallas, Texas, daughters April (Robbie) Munoz of San Antonio, and Sherri (Trey) Henry of Celina, and son Larry Southworth of McKinney, five grandchildren and nine great grandchildren and his sister in law.

He was preceded in death by his father Benjamin F. Brown III, his mother, Mary Hunt Brown, aunt, Louise Hunt, uncle, James Hunt and brother, Benjamin Franklin Brown IV.

Obit and Memories

What a Tribute for David Peeples!

Jeanne Harman sent this update about David Peeples visitation and graveside service:

There were about 300 at the visitation, per the funeral director.  The graveside was also adequately represented.  I saw WHS graduates from the class of 1960, 1961, and 1962.   Probably there were graduates from other classes as well.  Also attending were some of his AT&T workers, some of his Marine buddies, relatives, and many, many others whose lives were touched by David.

I want to mention a few things that you might find of interest.  When David found out he was terminal, he began planning every detail of his funeral.  He wrote his own obit.  When his Marine buddies and telephone buddies saw that part of David’s life was not mentioned, an extra sentence was added to the program to recognize that aspect of his life.  David was very specific that he wanted the poem about the Fisherman’s Prayer on the back of the program.  The pastor who presided at David’s service also performed the services for David’s parents and sister.

David was specific as to the flowers that he wanted on his casket as well as the casket itself.   He was so specific about the casket that when he was shown different caskets, he said I want “that one”.  When the funeral director told him they would get it ordered….David said “No, I want “THAT ONE“.  David even took down the serial number and said someone would check it to make certain it was the correct one when the time came. The funeral director said everyone had their marching orders.

I talked with the florist with whom David worked regarding his flowers. David was shown several books of pictures of arrangements on three or four different occasions. David kept going back to this one particular arrangement and decided upon it. Pam at Wolfe Florist said she made certain the arrangement was correct so that David would have approved.She said everyone who dealt with David fell in love with him.

David met his death head on and with such maturity.  We never really think about having to plan our own funeral.  We leave instructions on different things that we want, but those details are usually left to someone else.  Actually, to plan every detail of our very own funeral from start to finish is not something that most of us must face. I will say it again: Everyone who knew David was aware of how very well he lived the “dash” between his birth date and date of death.  David will be missed very much by so many!